Great Throughts Treasury

A database of quotes

Related Quotes

Yeruchem Levovitz, aka The Mashgiach

People become so used to being unhappy they are unaware of the needless misery they cause themselves. They imprison themselves by filling their minds with thoughts of resentment, hatred, envy, and desires. It is amazing how they tolerate living such a life. The only reason they do tolerate it is because they have become so used to living with such thoughts they fell it is the normal picture of life. They mistakenly think it is impossible for life to be any different.

Cause | Character | Envy | Life | Life | People | Reason | Resentment | Think |

John Locke

All virtue lies in a power of denying our own desires where reason does not authorize them.

Character | Power | Reason | Virtue | Virtue |

John Locke

The knowledge of our own being we have by intuition. The existence of a God, reason clearly makes known to us, as has been shown. The knowledge of existence of any other thing we can have only by sensation: for there being no necessary connection of real existence with any idea a man hath in his memory; nor of any other existence but that of God with the existence of any particular man: no particular man can know the existence of any other being but only when, by actual operating upon him, it makes itself perceived by him. For, the having the idea of anything in our mind, no more proves the existence of that thing, than the picture of a man evidences his being in the world, or the visions of a dream make thereby a true history.

Character | Existence | God | History | Intuition | Knowledge | Man | Memory | Mind | Reason | World | God |

John Locke

To love truth for truth's sake is the principal part of human perfection in this world, and the seed-plot of all other virtues.

Character | Love | Perfection | Truth | World |

Maier NULL

I consider the subordination of reason to the authority of any person to be idolatry.

Authority | Character | Reason | Wisdom |

Thomas Merton

We must be true inside, true to ourselves, before we can know a truth that is outside us.

Character | Truth |

Michel de Montaigne, fully Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne

He who establishes his argument by noise and command shows that reason is weak.

Argument | Character | Noise | Reason |

Theodore T. Munger

The meaning, the value, the truth of life can be learned only by an actual performance of its duties, and truth can be learned and the soul saved in no other way.

Character | Life | Life | Meaning | Soul | Truth |

Francis William Newman

Truth is congenial to man. Moral truth is then most consummate when, like beauty, it commends itself without argument. The righteous not only does right, but loves to do right.

Argument | Beauty | Character | Man | Right | Truth |

William H. Masters

Science by itself has no moral dimension. But it does seek to establish truth. And upon this truth morality can be built.

Character | Morality | Science | Truth |

Nicomachus of Gerasa NULL

If we crave for the goal that is worthy and fitting for man, namely, happiness of life - and this is accomplished by philosophy alone and by nothing else, and philosophy, as I said, means for us desire for wisdom, and wisdom the science of truth in things, and of things some are properly so called, others merely share the name - it is reasonable and most necessary to distinguish and systematize the accidental qualities of things.

Character | Desire | Distinguish | Life | Life | Man | Means | Nothing | Philosophy | Qualities | Science | Truth | Wisdom | Happiness |

Jacques Maritain

Since man is endowed with intelligence and determines his own ends, it is up to him to put himself in tune with the ends necessarily demanded by his nature. This means that there is, by very virtue of human nature, an order or a disposition which human reason can discover and according to which the human will must act in order to attune itself to the necessary ends of the human being. The unwritten law, or natural law, is nothing more than that.

Character | Ends | Human nature | Intelligence | Law | Man | Means | Nature | Nothing | Order | Reason | Virtue | Virtue | Will |

Madame de Motteville, Françoise Bertaut de Motteville

Without speech no reason, without reason no speech.

Character | Reason | Speech |

Maurice Nicoll

Man gains freedom only through the use of his highest faculties. Materialism makes him more and more a slave to the forces of the phenomenal world... Our present-day materialism points in this direction - that is, in the direction of the enslavement of man by mechanisation and by its direct results, by state organisations, uniformity, the sacrifice of independent intelligence, the sweeping away of individual differences, local customs, local diversity, and all the infinite branchings of humanity that enrich life... Man is made free by ‘truth’. The truth spoken here is equated with mind. This kind of truth begins with self-knowledge.

Character | Day | Diversity | Freedom | Humanity | Individual | Intelligence | Knowledge | Life | Life | Man | Materialism | Mind | Present | Sacrifice | Self | Self-knowledge | Truth | Uniformity | World |

H. L. Mencken, fully Henry Louis Mencken

It is hard to believe that a man is telling the truth when you know that you would lie if you were in his place.

Character | Man | Truth |

Prentice Mulford

All truth is safe and nothing else is safe, and he who keeps back the truth, or withholds it from men, from motives of expediency, is either a coward or a criminal or both.

Character | Men | Motives | Nothing | Safe | Truth |

Gabriel Sénac de Meilhan

There is no such thing as absolute truth... People are less deceived by failing to see the truth than by failing to see its limits.

Absolute | Character | People | Truth |

George S. Merriam

The passion for truth has underlying it a profound conviction that what is real is best; that when we get to the heart of things we shall find there what we most need.

Character | Heart | Need | Passion | Truth |