Great Throughts Treasury

A database of quotes

Related Quotes

William Blake

The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom. You never know what is enough unless you know what is more than enough.

Character | Enough | Excess | Wisdom |

Albert Einstein

Exaggerated respect for athletics, an excess of coarse impressions brought about by the technical discoveries of recent years, the increased severity of the struggle for existence due to the economic crisis, the brutalization of political life: all these factors are hostile to the ripening of the character and the desire for real culture, and stamp our age as barbarous, materialistic and superficial.

Age | Athletics | Character | Culture | Desire | Excess | Existence | Life | Life | Respect | Struggle | Respect |

Albert Einstein

I am absolutely convinced that no wealth in the world can help humanity forward, even in the hands of the most devoted worker in this cause. The example of great and pure personages is the only thing that can lead us to fine ideas and noble deeds. Money only appeals to selfishness and always irresistibly tempts its owners to abuse it.

Abuse | Cause | Character | Deeds | Example | Humanity | Ideas | Money | Selfishness | Wealth | World |

Anna Jameson

I have great admiration for power, a great terror of weakness, especially in my own sex, yet feel that my love is for those who overcome the mental and moral suffering and temptation through excess of tenderness rather than through excess of strength.

Admiration | Character | Excess | Love | Power | Strength | Suffering | Temptation | Tenderness | Terror | Weakness | Temptation |

Frederick Loomis, fully Sir Frederick Oscar Warren Loomis

Be yourself. Cultivate desirable qualities. Be alert. Look for opportunities to express yourself. Be positive. Determine your goal and the route to it. Be systematic. Take one step at a time. Be persistent. Hold to your course. Be a worker. Work your brain more than your body. Be a student. Know your job. Be fair. Treat the other man as you would be treated. Be temperate. Avoid excess in anything. Be confident. Have faith that cannot be weakened.

Body | Character | Excess | Faith | Man | Qualities | Time | Work |

Baron de Montesquieu, fully Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu

Men in excess of happiness or misery are equally inclined to severity. Witness conquerors and monks! It is mediocrity alone, and a mixture of prosperous and adverse fortune that inspire us with lenity and pity.

Character | Excess | Fortune | Mediocrity | Men | Pity | Witness | Happiness |

Baron de Montesquieu, fully Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu

Experience constantly proves that every man who has power is impelled to abuse it; he goes on till he is pulled up by some limits. Who would say; it! virtue even has need of limits.

Abuse | Character | Experience | Man | Need | Power | Virtue | Virtue |

Monvel, pseudonymn for Jacques Marie Boutet NULL

Some virtue is needed, but not too much. Excess in anything is a defect.

Character | Excess | Virtue | Virtue |

Michael Murphy

No discipline is immune to excess or lack of wisdom. All programs for human betterment can be undermined by ignorance, imcompetence, or moral perversity.

Character | Discipline | Excess | Ignorance | Wisdom |

Plautus, full name Titus Maccius Plautus NULL

Do you never look at yourself when you abuse another person?

Abuse | Character |

Plautus, full name Titus Maccius Plautus NULL

In everything the middle course is best: all things in excess bring trouble to men.

Character | Excess | Men | Trouble |

Publius Syrus

When you call a man ungrateful you have no words of abuse left.

Abuse | Character | Man | Words |

Richard Steele, fully Sir Richard Steele

I know no evil so great as the abuse of the understanding, and yet there is no one vice more common.

Abuse | Character | Evil | Understanding | Vice |

Jonathan Swift, pen names, M.B. Drapier, Lemuel Gulliver, Isaac Bickerstaff

Brisk talkers are usually slow thinkers. There is, indeed, no wild beast more to be dreaded than a communicative man having nothing to communicate. If you are civil to the voluble they will abuse your patience; if brusque, your character.

Abuse | Character | Man | Nothing | Patience | Thinkers | Will |

Richard Whately

When any person of really eminent virtue becomes the object of envy, the clamor and abuse by which he is assailed is but the sign and accompaniment of his success in doing service to the public. And if he is truly a wise man, he will take no more notice of it than the moon does of the howling of the dogs. Her only answer to them is to shine on.

Abuse | Character | Envy | Man | Object | Public | Service | Success | Virtue | Virtue | Will | Wise |

Apocrypha NULL

In overeating nests sickness, and excess leads to loathing.

Excess | Loathing | Wisdom |

Richard Whately

Superstition is not, as has been defined, an excess of religious feeling, but a misdirection of it, an exhausting of it on vanities of man’s devising.

Character | Excess | Man | Superstition |