Arnold Bennett, fully Enoch Thomas Arnold Bennett

Arnold
Bennett, fully Enoch Thomas Arnold Bennett
1867
1931

English Novelist, Playwright, Critic and Essayist

Author Quotes

Ardor in well-doing is a misleading and a treacherous thing. It cries out loudly for employment; you can't satisfy it at first; it wants more and more; it is eager to move mountains and divert the course of rivers. It isn't content till it perspires. And then, too often, when it feels the perspiration on its brow, it wearies all of a sudden and dies, without even putting itself to the trouble of saying, I've had enough of this.

Good clothes, when put to the test, survive a change in fortune, as a Roman arch survives the luxury of departed empire.

At moments we are all artists.

Good taste is better than bad taste, but bad taste is better than no taste.

Because her instinct has told her, or because she has been reliably informed, the faded virgin knows that the supreme joys are not for her; she knows by a process of the intellect; but she can feel her deprivation no more than the young mother can feel the hardship of the virgin's lot.

Great wealth may be to its owner a blessing or a curse. Alas! I fear it is too often the latter. It hardens the heart, blunts the finer susceptibilities, and transforms into a fiend what under more favourable circumstances might have been a human being.

A cause may be inconvenient, but it's magnificent. It's like champagne or high heels, and one must be prepared to suffer for it.

Being a husband is a whole time job. That is why so many husbands fail. They cannot give their entire attention to it.

Habits are the very dickens to change!

A failure or so, in itself, would not matter, if it did not incur a loss of self-esteem and of self-confidence. But just as nothing succeeds like success, so nothing fails like failure. Most people who are ruined are ruined by attempting too much. Therefore, in setting out on the immense enterprise of living fully and comfortably within the narrow limits of twenty-four hours a day, let us avoid at any cost the risk of an early failure. I will not agree that, in this business at any rate, a glorious failure is better than a petty success. I am all for the petty success. A glorious failure leads to nothing; a petty success may lead to a success that is not petty.

Beware of undertaking too much at the start. Be content with quite a little. Allow for accidents. Allow for human nature, especially your own.

happiness does not spring from the procuring of physical or mental pleasure, but from the development of reason and the adjustment of conduct to principles.

A first-rate organizer is never in a hurry. He is never late. He always keeps up his sleeve a margin for the unexpected.

But though you have the wealth of a cloak-room attendant at the Carlton Hotel, you cannot buy yourself a minute more time than I have, or the cat by the fire has.

Happiness includes chiefly the idea of satisfaction after full honest effort. No one can possibly be satisfied and no one can be happy who feels that in some paramount affairs he failed to take up the challenge of life.

A good novel rushes you forward like a skiff down a stream, and you arrive at the end, perhaps breathless, but unexhausted

Concentrate on something useful. Having decided to achieve a task, achieve it at all costs.

Humanity walks ever on a thin crust over terrific abysses.

A life in which conduct does not fairly well accord with principles is a silly life; and that conduct can only be made to accord with principles by means of daily examination, reflection, and resolution.

dazzling truth that you never will have more time, since you already have all the time there is?you

I do want an expensive honeymoon. Not because I'm extravagant, but because a honeymoon is a solemn, important thing ... a symbol. And it ought to be done -- well, adequately.

A man of sixty has spent twenty years in bed and over three years in eating.

Does there, I wonder, exist a being who has read all, or approximately all, that the person of average culture is supposed to have read, and that not to have read is a social sin? If such a being does exist, surely he is an old, a very old man.

I don't read my reviews, I measure them.

A sense of the value of time... is an essential preliminary to efficient work; it is the only method of avoiding hurry.

Author Picture
First Name
Arnold
Last Name
Bennett, fully Enoch Thomas Arnold Bennett
Birth Date
1867
Death Date
1931
Bio

English Novelist, Playwright, Critic and Essayist