Carl Jung, fully Carl Gustav Jung

Carl
Jung, fully Carl Gustav Jung
1875
1961

Swiss Psychiatrist, Influential Thinker, and Founder of Analytical Psychology

Author Quotes

The two fundamental points in dealing with dreams are these: First, the dream should be treated as a fact, about which one must make no previous assumption except that it somehow makes sense; and second, the dream is a specific expression of the unconscious.

The word `happiness’ would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness.

To ask the right question is already half the solution of a problem.

Unless we prefer to be made fools of by our illusions, we shall, by carefully analyzing every fascination, extract from it a portion of our own personality, like a quintessence, and slowly come to recognize that we meet ourselves time and time again in a thousand disguises on the path of life. This, however, is a truth which only profits the man who is temperamentally convinced of the individual and irreducible reality of his fellow man.

The cure works best when the doctor himself believes in his own formulae, otherwise he may be overcome by scientific doubt and so lose the proper convincing tone.

We are susceptible only to those suggestions with which we are already secretly in accord.

If one does not understand a person, one tends to regard him as a fool.

If there is anything we wish to change in our children, we should first examine it and see whether it is not something that could better be changed in ourselves.

If we want to understand the psyche we have to include the whole world.

Intuition [is] perception via the unconscious.

It is in the nature of political bodies always to see the evil in the opposite group, just as the individual has an ineradicable tendency to get rid of everything he does not know and does not want to know about himself by foisting it off on somebody else… Nothing has a more diverse and alienating effect upon society than this moral complacency and lack of responsibility, and nothing promotes understanding and rapprochement more than the mutual withdrawal of projections.

It is only our deeds that reveal who we are.

[Life’s great problems] can never be solved but only outgrown.

It seems to me… that external circumstances often serve as occasions for a new attitude to life and the world, long prepared in the unconscious, to become manifest.

Among all my patients in the second half of life – that is to say, over thirty-five – there has not been one whose problem in the last resort was not that of finding a religious outlook on life.

Learn your theories but put them aside when you confront the mystery of the living soul.

As any change must begin somewhere, it is the single individual who will experience it and carry it through. The change must indeed begin with an individual; it might be any one of us. Nobody can afford to look round and wait for somebody else to do what he is loath to do himself.

Nothing has a stronger influence psychologically on their environment and especially on their children than the unlived life of the parent.

As far we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being.

Nothing so promotes the growth of consciousness as [the] inner confrontation of opposites.

Christian civilization has proved hollow to a terrifying degree: it is all veneer, but the inner man has remained untouched, and therefore unchanged. His soul is out of key with his external beliefs; in his soul the Christian has not kept pace with external developments. Yes, everything is to e found outside – in image and in word, in Church and Bible – but never inside. Inside reign the archaic gods, supreme as of old.

Progressive mental development means, in effect, extension of consciousness.

Deep down, below the surface of the average man’s conscience, he hears a voice whispering. “There is something not right,” no matter how much his rightness is supported by public opinion or by the moral code.

Sentimentality is a superstructure covering brutality.

Everything living strives for wholeness.

Author Picture
First Name
Carl
Last Name
Jung, fully Carl Gustav Jung
Birth Date
1875
Death Date
1961
Bio

Swiss Psychiatrist, Influential Thinker, and Founder of Analytical Psychology