Friedrich Nietzsche, fully Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Friedrich
Nietzsche, fully Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
1844
1900

German Philosopher and Classical Philologist,wrote critical texts on Religion, Morality, Contemporary Culture, Philosophy and Science, most influential in Existentialism and Post-Modernism

Author Quotes

Art is the proper task of life, art is life's metaphysical exercise... Art is worth more than truth.

Art is essentially the affirmation, the blessing, and the deification of existence.

Arrogance in persons of merit affronts us more than arrogance in those without merit: merit itself is an affront.

And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once. And we should call every truth false which was not accompanied by at least one laugh.

An educator never say what he himself thinks, but only that which he thinks it is good for those whom he is educating to hear.

Although we live under the assumption that we think - it is more likely that we are being thought.

All truths that are kept silent become poisonous.

All of life is a dispute over taste and tasting.

All naturalism in morality, that is all healthy morality, is dominated by an instinct of life - some commandment of life is fulfilled through a certain canon of ‘shall’ and ‘shall not’, some hindrance and hostile element on life’s road is thereby removed. Anti-natural morality, that is virtually every morality that has hitherto been taught, reverenced and preached, turns on the contrary precisely against the instincts of life - it is a now secret, now loud and impudent condemnation of these instincts. By saying ‘God sees into the heart’ it denies the deepest and the highest desires of life and takes God for the enemy of life.

All ideals are dangerous, since they denigrate and stigmatize what is actual. They are poisons, which, however, as occasional medicaments, are indispensable.

All credibility, all good conscience, all evidence of truth come only from the senses.

Against war it may be said that it makes the victor stupid and the vanquished revengeful.

A very popular error - having the courage of one's convictions. Rather it is a matter of having the courage for an attack upon one's convictions.

A person's maturity consists in having found again the seriousness one had as a child, at play.

A nation is a detour of nature to arrive at six or seven great men - and then get around them.

A matter that becomes clear ceases to concern us.

A living being seeks, above all, to discharge its strength. Life is will to power.

A joke is an epigram on the death of a feeling.

A good war makes sacred any cause.

The universe as a circle consisting in a definite number of changes which continually recurs... activity is eternal, the number of the products and states is limited.

'Forgive us our virtues.' That is what we should ask of our neighbors.

'Every man has a price.' This is not true. but for every man there exists a bait which he cannot resist swallowing. To win over certain people to something, it is only necessary to give it a gloss of love of humanity, nobility, gentleness, self-sacrifice - and there is nothing you cannot get them to swallow. To their souls, these are the icing, the tidbit: other kinds of soul have others.

Morality is primarily a means of preserving the community and saving it from destruction. Next it is a means of maintaining the community on a certain plane and in a certain degree of benevolence.

One is healthy when one can laugh at the earnestness and zeal with which one has been hypnotized by any single detail of one's life.

Rather perish than hate and fear, and twice rather perish than make oneself hated and feared – this must someday become the highest maxim for every single commonwealth.

Author Picture
First Name
Friedrich
Last Name
Nietzsche, fully Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Birth Date
1844
Death Date
1900
Bio

German Philosopher and Classical Philologist,wrote critical texts on Religion, Morality, Contemporary Culture, Philosophy and Science, most influential in Existentialism and Post-Modernism