George MacDonald

George
MacDonald
1824
1905

Scottish Author, Poet and Minister known for his fairy tales and fantasy works

Author Quotes

To will not from self, but with the Eternal, is to live.

We weep for gladness, weep for grief; the tears they are the same; we sigh for longing, and relief; the sighs have but one name, and mingled in the dying strife, are moans that are not sad the pangs of death are throbs of life, its sighs are sometimes glad.

What we call evil, is the only and best shape, which, for the person and his condition at the time, could be assumed by the best good.

Where was God?

Yet I know that good is coming to me—that good is always coming; though few have at all times the simplicity and the courage to believe it. What we call evil, is the only and best shape, which, for the person and his condition at the time, could be assumed by the best good. And so, FAREWELL.

Troubled soul, thou are not bound to feel but thou art bound to arise. God loves thee whether thou feelest or not. Thou canst not love when thou wilt, but thou art bound to fight the hatred in thee to the last. Try not to feel good when thou art not good, but cry to Him who is good. He changes not because thou changest. Nay, He has an especial tenderness of love toward thee for that thou art in the dark and hast no light, and His heart is glad when thou doest arise and say, “I will go to my Father.” . . . Fold the arms of thy faith, and wait in the quietness until light goes up in thy darkness. For the arms of thy Faith I say, but not of thy Action: bethink thee of something that thou oughtest to do, and, go to do it, if it be but the sweeping of a room, or the preparing of a meal, or a visit to a friend. Heed not thy feeling: Do thy work.

Well, perhaps; but I begin to think there are better things than being comfortable.

When a feeling was there, they felt as if it would never go; when it was gone, they felt as if it had never been; when it returned, they felt as if it had never gone.

Wherein then lies the service of Death? … In this: it is not the fetters that gall, but the fetters that soothe, which eat into the soul. In this way is the loss of things … a motioning, hardly toward, yet in favor of, deliverance. It may seem to a man the first of his slavery when it is in truth the beginning of his freedom. Never soul was set free without being made to feel its slavery.

You allowed me existence, which is the sum of what one can demand of his fellow-beings

Trust is born in love, and our need is to love God, not apprehend facts concerning him.

Were I asked, what is a fairytale? I should reply, that is a fairytale ... of all fairytales I know, I think Undine the most beautiful.

When a man dreams his own dream, he is the sport of his dream; when another gives it him, that other is able to fulfill it.

Wherever there is anything to love, there is beauty in some form.

You doubt because you love truth.

Trust to God to weave your thread into the great web, though the pattern shows it not yet.

We're looking into conserving landfill space. We're looking to generate energy without relying on fossil fuel. So there's a lot of interest in using this waste stream and turning it into a beneficial product.

When a man is true, if he were in hell he could not be miserable. He is right with himself because right with Him whence he came. To be right with God is to be right with the universe: one with the power, the love, the will of the mighty Father, the cherisher of joy, the Lord of laughter, whose are all glories, all hopes, who loves everything and hates nothing but selfishness.

While a satisfied justice is an unavoidable eternal event, a satisfied revenge is an eternal impossibility.

You have tasted of death now, said the old man. Is it good? It is good, said Mossy. It is better than life. No, said the old man: it is only more life.

Two of you can be no match for the three giants, I will find you, if I can, a third brother, who will take on himself the third share of the fight, and the preparation...I will show him to you in a glass, and, when he comes, you will know him at once. If he will share your endeavors, you must teach him all you know, and he will repay you well, in present song, and in future deeds.' She opened the door of a curious old cabinet that stood in the room. On the inside of this door was an oval convex mirror...we at length saw reflected the place where we stood, and the old dame seated in her chair...at the feet of the dame lay a young man...weeping. 'Surely this youth will not serve our ends,' said I, 'for he weeps.' The old woman smiled. 'Past tears are present strength,' said she.

We've done a better job at getting more complete representation.

When I can no more stir my soul to move, and life is but the ashes of a fire; when I can but remember that my heart once used to live and love, long and aspire- O, be thou then the first, the one thou art; be thou the calling, before all answering love, and in me wake hope, fear, boundless desire.

Who can give a man this, his own name?

You may fancy the Lord had His own power to fall back upon. But that would have been to Him just the one dreadful thing. That His Father should forget him! -- no power in Himself could make up for that. He feared nothing for Himself; and never once employed His divine power to save Himself from His human fate. Let God do that for Him if He saw fit. He did not come into the world to take care of Himself... His life was of no value to Him but as His Father cared for it. God would mind all that was necessary for Him, and He would mind the work His Father had given Him to do. And, my friends, this is just the one secret of a blessed life, the one thing every man comes into this world to learn.

Author Picture
First Name
George
Last Name
MacDonald
Birth Date
1824
Death Date
1905
Bio

Scottish Author, Poet and Minister known for his fairy tales and fantasy works