Henry Fielding

Henry
Fielding
1707
1754

English Novelist and Dramatist best known for novel "Tom Jones"

Author Quotes

Adversity is the trial of principle. Without it, a man hardly knows whether he is honest or not.

Never trust the man who hath reason to suspect that you know he hath injured you.

Great joy, especially after a sudden change of circumstances, is apt to be silent, and dwells rather in the heart than on the tongue.

He that can heroically endure adversity will bear prosperity with equal greatest of the soul; for the mind that cannot be dejected by the former is not likely to be transported without the latter.

It is well known to all great men, that by conferring an obligation they do not always procure a friend, but are certain of creating many enemies.

Let no man be sorry he has done good because others have done evil. If a man has acted right, he has done well, though alone; if wrong, the sanction of all mankind will not justify him.

Men are strangely inclined to worship what they do not understand.

Neither great poverty nor great riches will hear reason.

One hour's sleep before midnight, is worth two after.

Riches without charity are nothing worth. They are a blessing only to him who makes them a blessing to others.

Superstition renders a man a fool, and skepticism makes him mad.

A rich man without charity is a rogue; and perhaps it would be no difficult matter to prove that he is also a fool.

A truly elegant taste is generally accompanied with excellency of heart.

Considering the unforeseen events of this world, we should be taught that no human condition should inspire men with absolute despair.

Custom may lead a man into many errors, but it justifies none.

One situation only of the married state is excluded from pleasure: and that is, a state of indifference.

A strenuous soul hates cheap success.

Perhaps the summary of good-breeding may be reduced to this rule. “Behave unto all men as you would they should behave to you.” This will most certainly oblige us to treat all mankind with the utmost civility and respect, there being nothing that we desire more than to be treated so by them.

A tender-hearted and compassionate disposition, which inclines men to pity and feel the misfortunes of others, and which is, even for its own sake, incapable of involving any man in ruin and misery, is of all tempers of mind the most amiable; and though it seldom receives much honor, is worthy of the highest.

The constant desire of pleasing, which is the peculiar quality of some, may be called the happiest of all desires in this, that it scarcely ever fails of attaining its ends, when not disgraced by affection.

Affectation proceeds from one of these two causes - vanity or hypocrisy; for as vanity puts us on affecting false characters, in order to purchase applause; so hypocrisy sets us on an endeavor to avoid censure, by concealing our vices under an appearance of their opposite virtues.

The prudence of the best heads is often defeated by the tenderness of the best of hearts.

As a great part of the uneasiness of matrimony arises from mere trifles, it would be wise in every young married man to enter into an agreement with his wife, that in all disputes of this kind the party who was most convinced they were right should always surrender the victory. By which means both would be more forward to give up the cause.

There are two considerations which always embitter the heart of an avaricious man - the one is a perpetual thirst after more riches, the other the prospect of leaving what he has already acquired.

Beauty may be the object of liking - great qualities of admiration - good ones of esteem - but love only is the object of love.

Author Picture
First Name
Henry
Last Name
Fielding
Birth Date
1707
Death Date
1754
Bio

English Novelist and Dramatist best known for novel "Tom Jones"