Henry Ward Beecher

Henry Ward
Beecher
1813
1887

American Clergyman, Editor, Writer

Author Quotes

Every man should use his intellect, not as he uses his lamp in the study, only for his own seeing, but as the lighthouse uses its lamp, that those afar off on the sea may see the shining, and learn their way.

Every charitable act is a stepping stone towards heaven.

Do not be afraid because the community teems with excitement. Silence and death are dreadful. The rush of life, the vigor of earnest men, the conflict of realities, invigorate, cleanse, and establish the truth.

Education is the knowledge of how to use the whole of oneself. Many men use but one or two faculties out of the score with which they are endowed. A man is educated who knows how to make a tool of every faculty - how to open it, how to keep it sharp, and how to apply it to all practical purposes.

Death is the dropping of the flower that the fruit may swell.

Communicate downwards to subordinates with at least the same care and attention as you communicate upward to superiors

Astronomers have built telescopes which can show myriads of stars unseen before; but when a man looks through a tear in his own eye, that is a lens which opens reaches in the unknown, and reveals orbs which no telescope, however skillfully constructed, could do; nay, which brings to view even the throne of God, and pierces that nebulous distance where are those eternal verities in which true life consists.

Children are the hands by which we take hold of heaven. By these tendrils we clasp it and climb thitherward. And why do we think that we are separated from them? We never half knew them, nor in this world could.

All words are pegs to hangs ideas on.

Affliction comes to us all not to make us sad, but sober, not to make us sorry, but wise; not to make us despondent, but by its darkness to refresh us, as the night refreshes the day; not to impoverish, but to enrich us, as the plough enriches the field; to multiply our joy, as the seed by planting, is multiplied a thousand-fold.

Age and youth look upon life from the opposite ends of the telescope; to the one it is exceedingly long, to the other exceedingly short.

A tool is but the extension of a man’s hand, and a machine is but a complex tool. And he that invents a machine augments the power of a man and the well-being of mankind.

A world without a Sabbath would be like a man without a smile, like a summer without flowers, and like a homestead without a garden. It is the joyous day of the whole week.

A man may be outwardly successful all his life long, and die hollow and worthless as a puff-ball; and he may be externally defeated all his life long, and die in the royalty of a kingdom established within him. A man's true estate of power and riches, is to be in himself; not in his dwelling, or position, or external relations, but in his own essential character. That is the realm on which he is to live, if he is to live as a good man.

A man ought to carry himself in the world as an orange tree would if it could walk up and down in the garden, swinging perfume from every little censer it holds up to the air.

A lie always needs a truth for a handle to it.

A man in old age is like a sword in the shop window. Men that look upon the perfect blade do not imagine the process by which it was completed. Man is a sword; daily life is the workshop; and God the artificer; and those cares which beats upon the anvil, and file the edge, and eat in, acid-like, the inscription on the hilt - those are the very things that fashion the man.

A helping word to one in trouble is often like a switch on a railroad-track - an inch between wreck and smooth-rolling prosperity.

A law is valuable not because it is a law, but because there is right in it.

A fortune is usually the greatest of misfortunes to children. It takes the muscles out of the limbs, the brain out of the head, and virtue out of the heart... In this world, it is not what we take up, but what we give up, that makes us rich.

A grindstone that has not grit in it, how long would it take to sharpen an axe? And affairs that had not grit in them, how long would they take to make a man?

While a man is stringing a harp, he tries the strings, not for music, but for construction. When it is finished it shall be played for melodies. God is fashioning the human heart for future joy. He only sounds a string here and there to see how far His work has progressed.

What the heart has once owned and had, it shall never lose.

When there is love in the heart there are rainbows in the eyes, which cover every black cloud with gorgeous hues.

Victories that are cheap are cheap. Those only are worth having which come as the result of hard fighting.

Author Picture
First Name
Henry Ward
Last Name
Beecher
Birth Date
1813
Death Date
1887
Bio

American Clergyman, Editor, Writer