Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May
Alcott
1832
1888

American Author and Novelist best known for Little Women

Author Quotes

Persuasive influences are better than any amount of moralizing.

Rivalry adds so much to the charm of one?s conquests.

She'll go and fall in love, and there's an end of peace and fun, and cozy times together.

Talent isn't genius, and no amount of energy can make it so. I want to be great, or nothing. I won't be a commonplace dauber, so I don't intend to try any more.

The humblest tasks get beautified if loving hands do them.

Then it was that Jo, living in the darkened room, with that suffering little sister always before her eyes and that pathetic voice sounding in her ears, learned to see the beauty and the sweetness of Beth's nature, to feel how deep and tender a place she filled in all hearts, and to acknowledge the worth of Beth's unselfish ambition to live for others, and make home happy by that exercise of those simple virtues which all may possess, and which all should love and value more than talent, wealth, or beauty.

Virtue, like sunshine, works its own sweet miracles.

What do girls do who haven't any mothers to help them through their troubles?

Work is and always has been my salvation and I thank the Lord for it.

Young minds cannot be driven.

Please could I say one word? was the question three times repeated before a rough head boobed out from the grotto of books in which Mac usually sat. Did anyone speak? he asked, blinking in teh flood of sunshine that entered with Rose. Only three times, thank you. Don't disturb yourself, I beg; for I merely want to say a word, answered Rose.

Rome took all the vanity out of me, for after seeing the wonders there, I felt too insignificant to live, and gave up all my foolish hopes in despair.

Simple, sincere people seldom speak much of their piety. It shows itself in acts rather than in words, and has more influence than homilies or protestations. Beth could not reason upon or explain the faith that gave her courage and patience to give up life, and cheerfully wait for death. Like a confiding child, she asked no questions, but left everything to God and nature, Father and Mother of us all, feeling sure that they, and they only, could teach and strengthen heart and spirit for this life and the life to come. She did not rebuke Jo with saintly speeches, only loved her better for her passionate affection, and clung more closely to the dear human love, from which our Father never means us to be weaned, but through which He draws us closer to Himself. She could not say, "I'm glad to go," for life was very sweet for her. She could only sob out, "I try to be willing," while she held fast to Jo, as the first bitter wave of this great sorrow broke over them together.

That boy is a perfect Cyclops, isn't he? said Amy one day, as Laurie clattered by on horseback, with a flourish of his whip as he passed.

The invigorating air did them both good, and much exercise worked wholesome changes in minds as well as bodies. They seemed to get clearer views of life and duty up there among the everlasting hills. The fresh winds blew away desponding doubts, delusive fancies, and moody mists. The warm spring sunshine brought out all sorts of aspiring ideas, tender hopes, and happy thoughts. The lake seemed to wash away the troubles of the past, and the grand old mountains to look benignly down upon them saying, "Little children, love one another."

There are many Beths in the world, shy and quiet, sitting in corners till needed, and living for others so cheerfully that no one sees the sacrifices till the little cricket on the hearth stops chirping, and the sweet, sunshiny presence vanishes, leaving silence and shadow behind.

Watch and pray, dear, never get tired of trying, and never think it is impossible to conquer your fault.

What do you want? and Rose looked up rather surprised.

Wouldn't it be fun if all the castles in the air which we make could come true and we could live in them?

Young people seldom turn out as one predicts, so it is of little use to expect anything,' said Mrs. Meg with a sigh. 'If our children are good and useful men and women, we should be satisfied; yet it's very natural to wish them to be brilliant and successful.

Politics were as bad as mathematics, and that the mission of politicians seemed to be calling each other names

Rose sat all alone in the big best parlor, with her little handkerchief laid ready to catch the first tear, for she was thinking of her troubles, and a shower was expected. She had retired to this room as a good place in which to be miserable; for it was dark and still, full of ancient furniture, somber curtains, and hung all around with portraits of solemn old gentlemen in wigs, severe-nosed ladies in top-heavy caps, and staring children in little bobtailed coats or short-waisted frocks. It was an excellent place for woe; and the fitful spring rain that pattered on the windowpane seemed to sob, Cry away; I'm with you.

Sitting patient in the shadow till the blessed light shall come, a serene and saintly presence sanctifies our troubled home. Earthly joys and hopes and sorrows break like ripples on the strand of the deep and solemn river where her willing feet now stand. O my sister, passing from me, out of human care and strife, leave me, as a gift, those virtues which have beautified your life. Dear, bequeath me that great patience which has power to sustain a cheerful, uncomplaining spirit in its prison-house of pain. Give me, for i need it sorely, of that courage, wise and sweet, which has made the path of duty green beneath your willing feet. Give me that unselfish nature, that with charity divine can pardon wrong for love's dear sake? meek heart, forgive me mine! Thus our parting daily loseth something of its bitter pain, and while learning this hard lesson, my great loss becomes my gain. For the touch of grief will render my wild nature more serene, give to life new aspirations, a new trust in the unseen. Henceforth, safe across the river, I shall see for evermore a beloved, household spirit waiting for me on the shore. Hope and faith, born of my sorrow, guardian angels shall become, and the sister gone before me by their hands shall lead me home.

That is a good book it seems to me, which is opened with expectation and closed with profit.

The little girls wore a grave, troubled expression, as if sorrow was a new experience to them.

Author Picture
First Name
Louisa May
Last Name
Alcott
Birth Date
1832
Death Date
1888
Bio

American Author and Novelist best known for Little Women