Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May
Alcott
1832
1888

American Author and Novelist best known for Little Women

Author Quotes

Poor Meg seldom complained, but a sense of injustice made her feel bitter toward everyone sometimes, for she had not yet learned to know how rich she was in the blessings which alone can make life happy.

She fell into the moody, miserable state of mind which often comes when strong wills have to yield to the inevitable.

So every day is a battle, and I'm so tired I don't want to live; only it's cowardly to die till you have done something.

That's it! said Jo to herself, when she at length discovered that genuine good will toward one's fellow men could beautify and dignify even a stout German teacher, who shoveled in his dinner, darned his own socks, and was burdened with the name of Bhaer.

The moment Aunt March took her nap, or was busy with company, Jo hurried to this quiet place, and curling herself up in the easy chair, devoured poetry, romance, history, travels, and pictures like a regular bookworm.

There is very little real liberty in the world; even those who seem freest are often the most tightly bound. Law, custom, public opinion, fear or shame make slaves of us all, as you will find when you try your experiment, said Tempest with a bitter smile. Law and custom I know nothing of, public opinion I despise, and shame and fear I defy, for everyone has a right to be happy in their own way.

We each are young, we each have a heart, Oh, why should we thus stand coldly apart

When I had the youth I had no money, now I have the money I have no time, and when I get the time, if I ever do, I shall have no health to enjoy life.

You are too much alike and too fond of freedom, not to mention hot tempers and strong wills, to get on happily together, in a relation which needs infinite patience and forbearance, as well as love.

Oh, Jo, how could you? Your one beauty.

Possessed of that indescribable charm called grace.

She had a decided mouth, a comical nose, and sharp, grey eyes, which appeared to see everything, and were by turns fierce, funny, or thoughtful,

So she doesn't call desertion, poverty, and hard work troubles? She's a brave little girl, and I shall be proud to know her.

That's loving our neighbor better than ourselves, and I like it.

The most intense desire gave force to her passionate words as the girl glanced despairingly about the dreary room like a caged creature on the point of breaking loose.

There were six dolls to be taken up and dressed every morning, for Beth was a child still, and loved her pets as well as ever. Not one whole or handsome one among them; all were outcasts till Beth took them in; for, when her sisters outgrew these idols, they passed to her.... Beth cherished them all the more tenderly for that very reason, and set up a hospital for infirm dolls. No pins were ever stuck into their cotton vitals; no harsh words or blows were ever given them; no neglect ever saddened the heart of the most repulsive: but all were fed and clothed, nursed and caressed, with an affection which never failed.

We live in a beautiful and wonderful world, Demi, and the more you now about it the wiser and the better you will be.

When Jo's conservative sister Meg says she must turn up her hair now that she is a young lady, Jo shouts, I'm not! and if turning up my hair makes me one, I'll wear it in two tails till I'm twenty.... I hate to think I've got to grow up, and be Miss March, and wear long gowns, and look as prim as a China aster! It's bad enough to be a girl anyway, when I like boys' games and work and manners! I can't get over my disappointment in not being a boy; and it's worse than ever now, for I'm dying to go and fight with Papa, and I can only stay at home and knit, like a poky old woman.

You do me proud, Captain. But, dear, I want to say one thing and then I'm done; for you don't need much advice of mine after my good man has spoken. I read somewhere that every inch of rope in the British Navy has a strand of red in it, so wherever a bit of it is found it is known. That is the text of my little sermon to you. Virtue, which means honour, honesty, courage, and all that makes character, is the red thread that marks a good man wherever he is. Keep that always and everywhere, so that even if wrecked by misfortune, that sign shall still be found and recognized. Yours is a rough life, and your mates not all we could wish, but you can be a gentleman in the true sense of the word; and no matter what happens to your body, keep your soul clean, your heart true to those who love you, and do your duty to the end.

Oh, Jo. Jo, you have so many extraordinary gifts; how can you expect to lead an ordinary life? You?re ready to go out and ? and find a good use for your talent. Tho? I don?t know what I shall do without my Jo. Go, and embrace your liberty. And see what wonderful things come of it.

Presently, out from the wrappings came a teapot, which caused her to clasp her hands with delight, for it was made in the likeness of a plump little Chinaman... Two pretty cups with covers, and a fine scarlet tray, completed the set, and made one long to have a dish of tea, even in Chinese style, without cream or sugar.

She had a womanly instinct that clothes possess an influence more powerful over many than the worth of character or the magic of manners.

So she enjoyed herself heartily, and found, what isn't always the case, that her granted wish was all she had hoped.

That's what old people are here for, ? else their experience is of little use.

The rooms were very still while the pages were softly turned and the winter sunshine crept in to touch the bright heads and serious faces with a Christmas greeting.

Author Picture
First Name
Louisa May
Last Name
Alcott
Birth Date
1832
Death Date
1888
Bio

American Author and Novelist best known for Little Women