Stefan Zweig

Stefan
Zweig
1881
1942

Austrian Author, Novelist, Playwright, Journalist and Biographer

Author Quotes

Decisive inventions and discoveries always are initiated by an intellectual or moral stimulus as their actual motivating force, but, usually, the final impetus to human action is given by material impulses ... merchants stood as a driving force behind the heroes of the age of discovery; this first heroic impulse to conquer the world emanated from very mortal forces

He who studies without passion will never become anything more than a pedant.

It is precisely those who are apparently aloof from the world who build for themselves a remarkable and thoroughly individual world in miniature, using their own special equipment, termite-like.

One never gets to know a person's character better than by watching his behavior during decisive moments.... It is always only danger which forces the most deeply hidden strengths and abilities of a human being to come forth.

Time to leave now, get out of this room, go somewhere, anywhere; sharpen this feeling of happiness and freedom, stretch your limbs, fill your eyes, be awake, wider awake, vividly awake in every sense and every pore.

Each of us, even the lowliest and most insignificant among us, was uprooted from his innermost existence by the almost constant volcanic upheavals visited upon our European soil and, as one of countless human beings, I can.

Heroic ages are not and never were sentimental and those daring conquistadores who conquered entire worlds for their Spain or Portugal received lamentably little thanks from their kings.

It is usual for a woman, even though she may ardently desire to give herself to a man, to feign reluctance, to simulate alarm or indignation. She must be brought to consent by urgent pleading, by lies, adjurations, and promises. I know that only professional prostitutes are accustomed to answer such an invitation with a perfectly frank assent — prostitutes, or simple-minded, immature girls.

Only ambition is fired by the coincidences of success and easy accomplishment.

Today, as a Jew, one should not have any position or accept any honors because it is difficult to live with those eternal compromises.

Erasmus was the light of his century; others were its strength: he lighted the way; others knew how to walk on it while he himself remained in the shadow as the source of light always does. But he who points the way into a new era is no less worthy of veneration than he who is the first to enter it; those who work invisibly have also accomplished a feat.

How terrible this darkness was, how bewildering, and yet mysteriously beautiful!

It would be foolhardy to count on the conscience of the world.

Only the misfortune of exile can provide the in-depth understanding and the overview into the realities of the world.

Today, for a Jew who writes in the German language, it is totally impossible to make a living. In no group do I see as much misery, disappointment, desperation and hopelessness as in Jewish writers who write in German.

A first premonition of the rich variety of life had come to him; for the first time he thought he had understood the nature of human beings - they needed each other even when they appeared hostile, and it was very sweet to be loved by them.

Even from the abyss of horror in which we try to feel our way today, half-blind, our hearts distraught and shattered, I look up again and again to the ancient constellations that shone on my childhood, comforting myself with the inherited confidence that, some day, this relapse will appear only an interval in the eternal rhythm of progress onward and upward.

I regard memory not as a phenomenon preserving one thing and losing another merely by chance, but as a power that deliberately places events in order or wisely omits them. Everything we forget about our own lives was really condemned to oblivion by an inner instinct long ago.

Life is futile unless it be directed towards a definite goal.

Only the person who has experienced light and darkness, war and peace, rise and fall, only that person has truly experienced life.

Truth to tell, we are all criminals if we remain silent....

A word is nothing unless it has values and an atmosphere, unless you grasp its historical significance.

Every wave, regardless of how high and forceful it crests, must eventually collapse within itself.

I, who unfortunately for me I always had a passionate curiosity for the things of the mind ...

Long-protracted suffering is apt to exhaust not only the invalid, but the compassion of others; violent emotions cannot be prolonged endlessly.

Author Picture
First Name
Stefan
Last Name
Zweig
Birth Date
1881
Death Date
1942
Bio

Austrian Author, Novelist, Playwright, Journalist and Biographer