Steve Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs

Steve
Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs
1955
2011

American Entrepreneur, Marketer, Designer, Inventor, Co-Founder and Chairman and CEO of Apple Inc., CEO and Co-Founder of Pixar Animation Studios, CEO and Founder of NeXT Inc.

Author Quotes

Why would I ever want to run Disney? Wouldn't it make more sense just to sell them Pixar and retire?

We've had one of these before, when the dot-com bubble burst. What I told our company was that we were just going to invest our way through the downturn, that we weren't going to lay off people, that we'd taken a tremendous amount of effort to get them into Apple in the first place -- the last thing we were going to do is lay them off.

What a computer is to me is the most remarkable tool that we have ever come up with. It's the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds.

What we want to do is make a leapfrog product that is way smarter than any mobile device has ever been, and super-easy to use. This is what iPhone is. OK? So, we're going to reinvent the phone.

What we're doing here will send a giant ripple through the universe.

When I hire somebody really senior, competence is the ante. They have to be really smart. But the real issue for me is, Are they going to fall in love with Apple? Because if they fall in love with Apple, everything else will take care of itself. They?ll want to do what?s best for Apple, not what?s best for them, what?s best for Steve, or anybody else.

We?re not going to be the first to this party, but we?re going to be the best.

Well, Apple invented the PC as we know it, and then it invented the graphical user interface as we know it eight years later (with the introduction of the Mac). But then, the company had a decade in which it took a nap.

We're gambling on our vision, and we would rather do that than make me too products. Let some other companies do that. For us, it's always the next dream.

We're going to be able to ask our computers to monitor things for us, and when certain conditions happen, are triggered, the computers will take certain actions and inform us after the fact.

We're just enthusiastic about what we do.

We've demonstrated a strong track record of being very disciplined with the use of our cash. We don't let it burn a hole in our pocket, we don't allow it to motivate us to do stupid acquisitions. And so I think that we'd like to continue to keep our powder dry, because we do feel that there are one or more strategic opportunities in the future.

We have always been shameless about stealing great ideas.

We hire people who want to make the best things in the world.

We made the buttons on the screen look so good you?ll want to lick them.

Think different.

We make tools for people. Tools to create, tools to communicate. The age we're living in, these tools surprise you.... That's why I love what we do. Because we make these tools, and we're constantly surprised with what people do with them.

This is what customers pay us for - to sweat all these details so it's easy and pleasant for them to use our computers. We're supposed to be really good at this. That doesn't mean we don't listen to customers, but it's hard for them to tell you what they want when they've never seen anything remotely like it.

We think Android is very, very fragmented, and becoming more fragmented by the day. And as you know, Apple strives for the integrated model so that the user isn't forced to be the systems integrator.

This revolution, the information revolution, is a revolution of free energy as well, but of another kind: free intellectual energy. It's very crude today, yet our Macintosh computer takes less power than a 100-watt bulb to run it and it can save you hours a day. What will it be able to do ten or 20 years from now, or 50 years from now?

We think basically you watch television to turn your brain off, and you work on your computer when you want to turn your brain on.

To turn really interesting ideas and fledgling technologies into a company that can continue to innovate for years, it requires a lot of disciplines.

We think the Mac will sell zillions, but we didn?t build the Mac for anybody else. We built it for ourselves. We were the group of people who were going to judge whether it was great or not. We weren?t going to go out and do market research. We just wanted to build the best thing we could build.

Ultimately, it comes down to taste. It comes down to trying to expose yourself to the best things that humans have done and then try to bring those things in to what you?re doing. Picasso had a saying: good artists copy, great artists steal. And we have always been shameless about stealing great ideas, and I think part of what made the Macintosh great was that the people working on it were musicians and poets and artists and zoologists and historians who also happened to be the best computer scientists in the world.

We used to dream about this stuff. Now we get to build it. It's pretty great.

Author Picture
First Name
Steve
Last Name
Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs
Birth Date
1955
Death Date
2011
Bio

American Entrepreneur, Marketer, Designer, Inventor, Co-Founder and Chairman and CEO of Apple Inc., CEO and Co-Founder of Pixar Animation Studios, CEO and Founder of NeXT Inc.