Temple Grandin, fully Mary Temple Grandin

Temple
Grandin, fully Mary Temple Grandin
1947

American Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University, Author, Autistic Activist, Consultant to Livestock Industry

Author Quotes

Unfortunately, most people never observe the natural cycle of birth and death. They do not realize that for one living thing to survive, another living thing must die.

We do know, however that almost no animal routinely kills prey animal on an indiscriminate basis. The only wild animal I?ve seen who will sometimes violate this rule is the coyote. Most of the time a coyote eats the animals he kills, but occasionally coyotes will go on a lamb-killing spree, killing twenty and eating only one. I believe it?s possible coyotes have lost some of their economy of behavior by living in close proximity to humans and overabundant food supplies. A coyote that kills twenty lambs and eats only one isn?t going to have to trek a hundred miles to find more lambs next week. Any sheep rancher will have several hundred other lambs that will be just as easy to catch later on, and the coyote knows it. Wild coyotes have probably lost the knowledge that you shouldn't waste food or energy.

We have got to work on keeping these children engaged with the world.

We raise them for us; that means we owe them some respect. Nature is cruel but we don?t have to be. I wouldn?t want to have my guts ripped out by a lion. I'd much rather die in a slaughter house if it were done right.

What a horse does under compulsion he does blindly, and his performance is no more beautiful than would be that of a ballet-dancer taught by whip and goad. The performances of horse or man so treated would seem to be displays of clumsy gestures rather than of grace and beauty. What we need is that the horse should of his own accord exhibit his finest airs and paces at set signals.

The most important thing people did for me was to expose me to new things.

The only place on earth where immortality is provided is in libraries. This is the collective memory of humanity.

The squeeze machine is not going to cure anybody, but it may help them relax; and a relaxed person will usually have better behavior.

The thing about being autistic is that you gradually get less and less autistic, because you keep learning, you keep learning how to behave. It's like being in a play; I'm always in a play.

The word autism still conveys a fixed and dreadful meaning to most people?they visualize a child mute, rocking, screaming, inaccessible, cut off from human contact. And we almost always speak of autistic children, never of autistic adults, as if such children never grew up, or were somehow mysteriously spirited off the planet, out of society.

The worst thing you can do is nothing. (re: teaching children with autism).

There definitely are some strengths [having autism]. You see, there?s a point where mild autism is just a personality variation. There?s no black and white dividing line between autism and non-autism from the mild end of the spectrum. And some people on the mild end of the spectrum have extreme talent areas in things like computer programming, mathematics, art, design, graphics, writing skills, and I?m a big believer on building on the child?s strengths.

There is a tremendous range of children with a PDD label.

There tends to be a lot of autism around the tech centers... when you concentrate the geeks, you're concentrating the autism genetics.

The big companies are like steel and activists are like heat. Activists soften the steel, and then I can bend it into pretty grillwork and make reforms.

The easiest words for an autistic child to learn are nouns, because they directly relate to pictures. Highly verbal autistic children like I was can sometimes learn how to read with phonics. Written words were too abstract for me to remember, but I could laboriously remember the approximately fifty phonetic sounds and a few rules.

Some teachers just have a knack for working with autistic children. Other teachers do not have it.

Sometimes you have to go outside your field of study to find the right people.

Parents get so worried about the deficits that they don't build up the strengths, but those skills could turn into a job," said Grandin, who addresses scientific advances in understanding autism in her newest book, "The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum." "These kids often have uneven skills. We need to be a lot more flexible about things. Don't hold these math geniuses back. You're going to have to give them special ed in reading because that tends to be the pattern, but let them go ahead in math.

People are always looking for the single magic bullet that will totally change everything. There is no single magic bullet.

Pressure is calming to the nervous system.

Research has shown that a barren environment is much more damaging to baby animals than it is to adult animals. It does not hurt the adult animals the same way it damages babies.

Research is starting to show that a child should be engaged at least 20 hours a week. I do not think it matters which program you choose as long as it keeps the child actively engaged with the therapist, teacher, or parent for at least 20 hours a week.

Social thinking skills must be directly taught to children and adults with ASD. Doing so opens doors of social understandings in all areas of life.

Some autistic children cannot stand the sound of certain voices. I have come across cases where teachers tell me that certain children have problems with their voice or another person?s voice. This problem tends to be related to high-pitched ladies? voices.

Author Picture
First Name
Temple
Last Name
Grandin, fully Mary Temple Grandin
Birth Date
1947
Bio

American Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University, Author, Autistic Activist, Consultant to Livestock Industry