Winston Churchill, fully Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill

Winston
Churchill, fully Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill
1874
1965

British Conservative Politician, Statesman, Historian, Artist, Writer, Served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature, Honorary Citizen of the United States, Commander of the 6th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, Minister of Munitions, Secretary of State for War, First Lord of the Admiralty, Chancellor of the Exchequer

Author Quotes

Unpunctuality is a vile habit, and all my life I have tried to break myself of it.

Watch your thoughts, they become your words.

We cannot tell whether Hitler will be the man who will once again let loose upon the world another war in which civilization will irretrievably succumb, or whether he will go down in history as the man who restored honor and peace of mind to the Great Germanic nation.

Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilization. Upon it depend our own British life and the long continuity of our institutions and our Empire. The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us now. Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age, made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.'

Watch your words, they become your actions.

We contend that for a nation to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle. A sheep in sheep's clothing. [on Clement Atlee)]

Vast and fearsome as the human scene has become, personal contact of the right people, in the right places, at the right time, may yet have a potent and valuable part to play in the cause of peace which is in our hearts.

We (The British) have not journeyed across the centuries, across the oceans, across the mountains, across the prairies, because we are made of sugar candy.

We contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.

Victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory however long and hard the road may be; for without victory there is no survival.

We are all worms, but I do believe I am a glowworm.

We get to make a living; we give to make a life.

Victory is the beautiful, bright-colored flower. Transport is the stem without which it could never have blossomed.

We are asking the nations of Europe between whom rivers of blood have flowed to forget the feuds of a thousand years.

We have a lot of anxieties, and one cancels out another very often.

Votes out of over twenty thousand cast. At the General Election I was returned for Epping by a ten thousand majority, but as a Constitutionalist.

We are happier in many ways when we are old than when we were young. The young sow wild oats. The old grow sage.

We have a very daring and skillful opponent against us, and, may I say across the havoc of war, a great general.

Want of foresight, unwillingness to act when action would be simple and effective, lack of clear thinking, confusion of counsel until the emergency comes, until self-preservation strikes its jarring gong-these are the features which constitute the endless repetition of history.

We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out.

We have all seen with a sense of nausea the abject, squalid, shameless avowal made in the Oxford Union. We are told that we ought not to treat it seriously. The Times talked of the childrens hour. I disagree. It is a very disquieting and disgusting symptom. One can almost feel the curl of contempt upon the lips of the manhood of Germany, Italy, and France when they read the message sent out by Oxford University in the name of Young England. Let them be assured that it is not the last word. But before they blame, as blame they should, these callow ill-tutored youths, they must be sure that they have not been set a bad example by people much older and much higher up.

War is a game that is played with a smile. If you can't smile, grin. If you can't grin, keep out of the way till you can.

We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those who have allowed us to escape.

We have always found the Irish a bit odd. They refuse to be English.

Thus far then have we travelled along the terrible road we chose at the call of duty. The mood of Britain is wisely and rightly averse from every form of shallow or premature exultation. This is no time for boasts or glowing prophecies, but there is this: A year ago our position looked forlorn, and well-nigh desperate to all eyes but our own. To-day we may say aloud before an awe-struck world: 'We are still masters of our fate. We are still captain of our souls.

Author Picture
First Name
Winston
Last Name
Churchill, fully Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill
Birth Date
1874
Death Date
1965
Bio

British Conservative Politician, Statesman, Historian, Artist, Writer, Served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature, Honorary Citizen of the United States, Commander of the 6th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, Minister of Munitions, Secretary of State for War, First Lord of the Admiralty, Chancellor of the Exchequer