Great Throughts Treasury

A database of quotes

Quotes Listing

Berthold Auerbach

Being alone when one’s belief is firm, is not to be alone.

Belief | Character |

Berthold Auerbach

Of all afflictions, the worst is self-contempt.

Character | Contempt | Self |

Berthold Auerbach

All men are selfish, but the vain man is in love with himself. He admires, like the lover his adored one, everything which to others is indifferent.

Character | Love | Man | Men |

Berthold Auerbach

Garden work consists more in uprooting weeds than in planting seed. This applies also to teaching.

Character | Work |

Meher Baba, born Merwan Sheriar Irani

Love has to spring spontaneously from within. It is no way amenable to any form of inner or outer force. Love and coercion can never go together; but though Love cannot be forced on anyone, It can be awakened in him through Love itself. Love is essentially self-communicative. Those who do not have It catch It from those who have It. True love is unconquerable and irresistible; and It goes on gathering power and spreading Itself, until eventually It transforms everyone whom It touches.

Character | Coercion | Force | Love | Power | Self |

Honoré de Balzac

Emulation is not rivalry. Emulation is the child of ambition; rivalry is the unlovable daughter of envy.

Ambition | Character | Daughter | Envy | Rivalry | Child |

Honoré de Balzac

There are no little events with the heart. It magnifies everything; it places in the same scales the fall of an empire of fourteen years and the dropping of a woman’s glove, and almost always the glove weighs more than the empire.

Character | Events | Heart | Little | Woman |

Isaac Barrow

Nothing has wrought more prejudice to religion, or brought more disparagement upon truth, than boisterous and unseasonable zeal.

Character | Disparagement | Nothing | Prejudice | Religion | Truth | Zeal |

Isaac Barrow

None are too wise to be mistaken, but few are so wisely just as to acknowledge and correct their mistakes, and especially the mistakes of prejudice.

Character | Prejudice | Wise |

James Beattie

Let us cherish sympathy. By attention and exercise it may be improved in every man. It prepares the mind for receiving the impressions of virtue; and without it there can be no true politeness. Nothing is more odious than that insensibility which wraps a man up in himself and his own concerns, and prevents his being moved with either the joys or the sorrows of another.

Attention | Character | Man | Mind | Nothing | Sympathy | Virtue | Virtue |

Naftali Zvi Horowitz of Ropshitz

There will always be people who criticize the behavior of others, regardless of how great they are or what they do.

Behavior | Character | People | Will |

Thomas Adam

Esteeming others merely for their agreement with us in religion, opinion, and manner of living is only a less offensive kind of self-adoration.

Character | Opinion | Religion | Self |

Lord Acton, John Emerich Dalberg-Acton

Liberty is not a means to a higher political end. It is itself the highest political end.

Character | Liberty | Means | Wisdom |

Thomas Adams

No coming to heaven with dry eyes.

Character | Heaven |

George Matthew Adams

One of the great arts in living is to learn the art of accurately appraising values. Everything that we think, that we earn, that we have given to us, that in any way touches our consciousness, has its own value. These values are apt to change with the mood, with time, or because of circumstances. We cannot safely tie to any material value. The values of all material possessions change continually, sometimes over night. The real values are those that stay by you, give you happiness and enrich you. They are the human values.

Art | Change | Character | Circumstances | Consciousness | Possessions | Time | Art | Happiness | Learn |

Louis-Aimé Martin

All our first movements are good, generous, heroical; reflection weakens and kills them.

Character | Good | Reflection |

Louis-Aimé Martin

Kindness, the poetry of the heart.

Character | Heart | Kindness | Poetry |

George Matthew Adams

Upon every hand we meet with those who have some secret resentment that is ever being nurtured within their hearts. They resent the success, or happiness of some one whom they think is less deserving than they are. They resent the just recognition that comes to others from work and long effort to excel. Or, they may resent being born poor - or resent the fact that they were even born!... Strive to excel, strive to achieve, where others have failed, and you will find no space within your mind to lodge resentment. Resentment is the child of selfishness, foolish envy, and inactivity... Our life upon this earth is too valuable for resentment of any kind. There is so much to do, so much to learn - so little time in which to live and work it all out.

Character | Earth | Effort | Envy | Inactivity | Life | Life | Little | Mind | Resentment | Selfishness | Space | Success | Time | Will | Work | Child | Happiness | Learn | Think |

Thomas Bailey Aldrich

A man is known by the company his mind keeps.

Character | Man | Mind |

Albertano of Brescia NULL

The angry man always thinks he can do more than he can.

Character | Man |

Judith Anderson, born Frances Margaret Anderson-Anderson, aka Dame Judith Anderson

There is nothing enduring in life for a woman except what she builds in a man's heart.

Character | Life | Life | Man | Nothing | Woman |

Michelangelo, aka Michaelangelo Buonarroti, fully Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni NULL

The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short; but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark.

Character | Danger | Perfection | Trifles | Danger |

Khajah Abdullah Ansari of Herat, Abu Ismaïl Abdullah ibn Abi-Mansour Mohammad or Khajah Abdullah Ansari of Herat

Treat others as thou wouldst be treated; dispense not to others what thou likest not for thyself.

Character |

Marcus Aurelius, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus

A great estate is a great disadvantage to those who do not know hot to use it, for nothing is more common than to see wealthy persons live scandalously and miserably; riches do them no service in order to virtue and happiness; it is precept and principle, not an estate, that makes a man good for something.

Character | Good | Man | Nothing | Order | Precept | Riches | Service | Virtue | Virtue | Riches |

Marcus Aurelius, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus

Nothing is evil which is according to nature.

Character | Evil | Nature | Nothing |

Marcus Aurelius, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus

To live each day as though one's last, never flustered, never apathetic, never attitudinizing - here is the perfection of character.

Character | Day | Perfection |

Apocrypha NULL

With little or with much, be content.

Character | Little |

Marcus Aurelius, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus

What a great deal of ease that man gains who lets his neighbor's behavior alone and takes care that his own actions are honest.

Behavior | Care | Character | Man |

Berthold Auerbach

There is no greatness that does not rest on true morality.

Character | Greatness | Morality | Rest |

Austonius, fully Decimus Magnus Ausonius

Enjoy your possessions as mortal; see to them as though immortal.

Character | Mortal | Possessions |

W. H. Auden, fully Wystan Hugh Auden

Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh.

Character | Love | Wisdom |

Abraham ben Moses ben Maimon, aka Rabbi Avraham Maimuni, aka Rabbeinu Avraham ben ha-Rambam NULL

Once you are used to something, you feel some suffering if you lack it. Be very careful before making something a habit.

Character | Habit | Suffering |

Abraham ben Moses ben Maimon, aka Rabbi Avraham Maimuni, aka Rabbeinu Avraham ben ha-Rambam NULL

Anger an arrogance are partners. Inner feelings of conceit lead a person to become angry. Conversely, humility leads to forgiveness.

Anger | Arrogance | Character | Feelings | Forgiveness | Humility |

Walter Bagehot

It is good to be without vices, but it is not good to be without temptations.

Character | Good |

H. B.

I saw there was no boundary lines between vegetable and animal life, and hence no beginning nor end to either... All physical phenomena, at their best, are dull and murky till they come up into spiritual life. As an illustration that every law has its universality take the familiar law or principle that action and reaction are equal. What is this but reaping the whirlwind after one has sown the wind, or how does natural law differ from this teaching: ‘Whatsoever a man soweth that shall he also reap?’ Are they aught but different strains in the great cosmic melody?

Action | Beginning | Character | Law | Life | Life | Man | Melody | Phenomena |

Rabbi Dov Ber of Mezeritch, aka Maggid of Mezeritch

I cannot teach you the ten principles of service. But a little child and a thief can show you what they are. From the child you can learn three things: He is merry for no particular reason; never for a moment is he idle; when he needs something, he demands it vigorously. The thief can instruct you in seven things: He does his service by night; if he does not finish what he has set out to do, in one night, he devotes the next night to it; he and those who work with him love one another; he risks his life for small gains; what he takes has so little value for him that he gives it up for a very small coin; he endures blows and hardship, and it matters nothing to him; he likes his trade and would not exchange it for any other.

Character | Life | Life | Little | Love | Nothing | Principles | Reason | Service | Teach | Work | Child | Learn | Value |

Honoré de Balzac

Hatred is the vice of narrow souls; they feed it with all their littlenesses, and make it the pretext of base tyrannies.

Character | Vice |

Honoré de Balzac

Novelty is both delightful and deceptive.

Character | Novelty |

George Bancroft

Falsehood and death are synonymous.

Character | Death | Falsehood | Wisdom |