Great Throughts Treasury

A database of quotes

Related Quotes

Francis Beaumont

If men would wound you with injuries, meet them with patience: hasty words rankle the wound, soft language, dresses it, forgiveness cures it, and oblivion takes away the scar. It is more noble by silence to avoid an injury than by argument to overcome it.

Argument | Character | Forgiveness | Language | Men | Oblivion | Patience | Silence | Words | Forgiveness |

Hugh Blair

Graceful, particularly in youth, is the tear of sympathy, and the heart that melts at the tale of woe; we should not permit ease and indulgence to contract our affections, and wrap us up in selfish enjoyment. But we should accustom ourselves to think of the distresses of human life, of the solitary cottage, the dying parent, and the weeping orphan. Nor ought we ever to sport with pain and distress in any of our amusements, or treat even the meanest insect with wanton cruelty.

Amusements | Character | Cruelty | Distress | Enjoyment | Heart | Indulgence | Life | Life | Pain | Sympathy | Woe | Youth | Think |

Hugh Blair

Nothing leads more directly to the breach of charity, and to the injury and molestation of our fellow-creatures than the indulgence of an ill temper.

Character | Charity | Indulgence | Nothing | Temper |

Robert Dodsley

Though a taste of pleasure may quicken the relish of life, an unrestrained indulgence leads to inevitable destruction.

Character | Indulgence | Inevitable | Life | Life | Pleasure | Taste |

Edicts of Ashoka NULL

He who does reverence to his own sect, while disparaging the sects of others wholly from attachment to his own, with intent to enhance the glory of his own sect, in reality by such conduct inflicts the severest injury on his own sect. Concord therefore is meritorious, to wit, hearkening and hearkening willingly to the Law of Piety, as accepted by other people.

Character | Conduct | Glory | Law | People | Piety | Reality | Reverence | Wit |

Benjamin Franklin

Doing an Injury puts you below your Enemy; Revenging one makes you even with him; Forgiving it sets you above him.

Character | Enemy |

Henry Home, Lord Kames

No man ever did a designed injury to another, but at the same time he did a greater to himself.

Character | Man | Time |

David Hume

The greater part of mankind are naturally apt to be affirmative and dogmatical in their opinions; and while they see objects only on one side, and have no idea of any counterpoising argument, they throw themselves precipitately into the principles, to which they are inclined; nor have they any indulgence for those who entertain opposite sentiments. To hesitate or balance perplexes their understanding, checks their passion, and suspends their action.

Action | Argument | Balance | Character | Indulgence | Mankind | Passion | Principles | Understanding |

Søren Kierkegaard, fully Søren Aabye Kierkegaard

Each age has its own characteristic depravity. Ours is perhaps not pleasure or indulgence or sensuality, but rather a dissolute pantheistic contempt for the individual man.

Age | Character | Contempt | Individual | Indulgence | Man | Pleasure | Sensuality |

Fynes Moryson

He invites a new injury who bears the old patiently.

Character | Old |

Michel de Montaigne, fully Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne

I do myself a greater injury in lying than I do him of whom I tell a lie.

Character | Lying |

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Temperance and labor are the two best physicians; the one sharpens the appetite - the other prevents indulgence to excess.

Appetite | Character | Excess | Indulgence | Labor |

Publius Syrus

The best remedy for an injury is to forget it.

Character |

Publius Syrus

One ungrateful man does an injury to all who stand in need of aid.

Aid | Character | Man | Need |

Madame Roland, Jeanne Manon Philon, born Marie-Jeanne Phlipon

What indulgence does the world extend to those evil-speakers who, under the mask of friendship, stab indiscriminately with the keen, though rusty blade of slander!

Character | Evil | Indulgence | Slander | World |

Lord Samuel, Herbert Louis Samuel, First Viscount Samuel

Without doubt the greatest injury of all was done by basing morals on myth. For, sooner or later, myth is recognized for what it is, and disappears. Then morality loses the foundation on which it has been built.

Character | Doubt | Morality | Myth |