Great Throughts Treasury

A database of quotes

Related Quotes

Berthold Auerbach

Discontent is the source of all trouble, but also of all progress in individuals and in nations.

Character | Discontent | Nations | Progress |

Nancy Astor, fully Lady Nancy Witcher Astor, Viscountess Astor

Real education should educate us out of self into something far finer - into selflessness which links us with all humanity.

Character | Education | Humanity | Self |

Norman O. Brown, fully Norman Oliver Brown

What education does is to put a series of filters over your awareness so that year by year... you experience less and less.

Awareness | Character | Education | Experience | Awareness |

William J. H. Boetcker, fully William John Henry Boetcker

Your greatness is measured by your kindness - Your education and intellect by your modesty - Your ignorance is betrayed by your suspicions and prejudices - Your real caliber is measured by the consideration and tolerance you have for others.

Character | Consideration | Education | Greatness | Ignorance | Kindness | Modesty | Intellect |

M. L. Boren

You should have education enough so that you won't have to look up to people; and then more education so that you will be wise enough not to look down on people.

Character | Education | Enough | People | Will | Wisdom | Wise |

Charles Pierre Baudelaire

There can be no progress - real, moral progress - except in the individual and by the individual himself.

Character | Individual | Progress | Wisdom |

Caroline Bird

A liberal-arts education is supposed to provide you with a value system, a standard, a set of ideas, not a job.

Character | Education | Ideas | System | Value |

Seymour Cohen, fully Seymour Jay Cohen

American education needs training for character.

Character | Education | Training |

William Congreve

The essence of all education is self-discovery and self-control. When education helps an individual to discover his own powers and limitations and, shows him how to get out of his heredity its largest and best possibilities, it will fulfill its real function, when children are taught not merely to know things but particularly to know themselves, not merely how to do things but especially how to compel themselves to do things, they may be said to be really educated. For this sort of education there is demanded rigorous discipline of the powers of observation, of the reason, and especially of the will.

Character | Children | Control | Discipline | Discovery | Education | Heredity | Individual | Observation | Reason | Self | Self-control | Will |

Calvin Coolidge, fully John Calvin Coolidge, Jr.

Little progress can be made by merely attempting to repress what is evil; our great hope lies in developing what is good.

Character | Evil | Good | Hope | Little | Progress |

Canassatego Treaty of Lancaster NULL

You who are so wise must know that different nations have different conceptions of things. You will not therefore take it amiss if our ideas of the white man’s kind of education happens not to be the same as yours. We have had some experience with it. Several of our young people were brought up in your colleges. They were instructed in all your sciences; but, when they came back to us, they were bad runners, ignorant of every means of living in the woods, unable to bear either cold or hunger. They didn’t know how to build a cabin, take a deer, or kill an enemy. They spoke our language imperfectly. They were therefore unfit to be hunters, warriors, or counselors; they were good for nothing. We are, however, not less obliged for your kind offer, though we decline accepting it. To show our gratefulness, if the gentlemen of Virginia shall send us a dozen of their sons, we will take great care with their education, instruct them in all we know, and make men of them.

Care | Character | Education | Enemy | Experience | Good | Hunger | Ideas | Kill | Language | Man | Means | Men | Nations | Nothing | People | Will | Wise |

Isidore van Cleef

Tolerance does not mark the progress of religion. It is the fatal sign of its decline.

Character | Progress | Religion |

Samuel Butler

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world, but the unreasonable man tries to adapt the world to him - therefore, all progress depends upon the unreasonable man.

Character | Man | Progress | World |

Calvin Coolidge, fully John Calvin Coolidge, Jr.

Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education alone will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.

Character | Determination | Education | Genius | Men | Nothing | Persistence | Will | World | Talent |

William Ellery Channing

No man should part with his own individuality and become that of another.

Character | Individuality | Man | Wisdom |

William Ellery Channing

The world is governed much more by opinion than by laws. It is not the judgment of courts, but the moral judgment of individuals and masses of men, which is the chief wall of defence around property and life. With the progress of society, this power of opinion is taking the place of arms.

Character | Judgment | Life | Life | Men | Opinion | Power | Progress | Property | Society | World |