Great Throughts Treasury

A database of quotes

Related Quotes

Louis-Aimé Martin

All our first movements are good, generous, heroical; reflection weakens and kills them.

Character | Good | Reflection |

Marcus Aurelius, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus

Remember this, that there is a proper dignity and proportion to be observed I the performance of every act of life.

Character | Dignity | Life | Life |

Marcus Aurelius, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus

There is a proper dignity and proportion to be observed in the performance of every act of life.

Character | Dignity | Life | Life |

Thomas Boston

Temptation is the fire that brings up the scum of the heart.

Character | Heart | Temptation |

Hugh Blair

Dissimulation in youth is the forerunner of perfidy in old age; its first appearance is the fatal omen of growing depravity and future shame. It degrades parts and learning obscures the luster of every accomplishment and sinks us into contempt. The path of falsehood is a perplexing maze. After the first departure from sincerity, it is not in our power to stop; one artifice unavoidably leads on to another, till, as the intricacy of the labyrinth increases, we are left entangled in our snare.

Accomplishment | Age | Appearance | Artifice | Character | Contempt | Falsehood | Future | Learning | Old age | Perfidy | Power | Shame | Sincerity | Youth | Youth | Old |

Richard Maurice Bucke, often called Maurice Bucke

When a person who was self conscious only, enters into cosmic consciousness - he knows without learning certain things... that the universe is not a dead machine but a living presence... that in its essence and tendency it is infinitely good... that individual existence is continuous beyond what is called death.

Character | Consciousness | Death | Existence | Good | Individual | Learning | Self | Universe |

Susan Fenimore Cooper, fully Susan Augusta Fenimore Cooper

A true history of human events would show that a far larger proportion of our acts are the results of sudden impulses and accidents than of that reason of which we so much boast.

Character | Events | History | Reason | Wisdom |

James Fenimore Cooper

A true history of human events would show a far larger proportion of our acts are the results of sudden impulses and accident, than of that reason of which we so much boast.

Accident | Character | Events | History | Reason |

Pierre Cornielle

The fire which seems extinguished often slumbers beneath the ashes.

Character | Wisdom |

Jeremy Collier

Conscience and covetousness are never to be reconciled; like fire and water they always destroy each other, according tot he predominancy of the element.

Character | Conscience | Destroy |

George Crabbe

How often do we sigh for opportunities of doing good, whist we neglect the openings of Providence in little things, which would frequently lead to the accomplishment of most important usefulness!... Good is done by degrees. However small in proportion the benefits which follow individual attempts to do good, a great deal may thus be accomplished by perseverance, even in the midst of discouragements and disappointments.

Accomplishment | Character | Good | Important | Individual | Little | Neglect | Perseverance | Providence | Usefulness |

James A. Farley

The best advice I can give to any young man or young woman upon graduation from school can be summed up in exactly eight words, and they are - be honest with yourself and tell the truth.

Advice | Character | Man | Truth | Woman | Words |

Antoinette Du Ligier de la Garde Deshoulières

Seeking to know is only too often learning to doubt.

Character | Doubt | Learning |

Taisen Deshimaru

You must concentrate upon and consecrate yourself wholly to each day, as though a fire were raging in your hair.

Character | Day |

Henry Fielding

There is a sort of knowledge beyond the power of learning to bestow, and this is to be had in conversation; so necessary is this to the understanding the characters of men, that none are more ignorant of them than those learned pedants whose lives have been entirely consumed in colleges and among books; for however exquisitely human nature may have been described by writers the true practical system can be learned only in the world.

Books | Character | Conversation | Human nature | Knowledge | Learning | Men | Nature | Power | System | Understanding | World |

Edgar Z. Friedenberg

So much of learning to be an American is learning not to let your individuality become a nuisance.

Character | Individuality | Learning |

Madame Émile de Girardin, Delphine de Girardin, née Gay

To love one who loves you, to admire one who admires you, in a word to be the idol of one’s idol - is exceeding the limit of human joy; it is stealing fire from heaven, and deserves death.

Character | Death | Heaven | Joy | Love |