Great Throughts Treasury

A database of quotes

Related Quotes

Henry Adams, aka Henry Brooks Adams

From cradle to grave this problem of running order through chaos, direction through space, discipline through freedom, unity through multiplicity, has always been, and must always be, the task of education.

Character | Discipline | Education | Freedom | Grave | Order | Space | Unity |

Henry Adams, aka Henry Brooks Adams

Chaos often breeds life, when order breeds habit.

Character | Habit | Life | Life | Order |

Marcus Aurelius, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus

A great estate is a great disadvantage to those who do not know hot to use it, for nothing is more common than to see wealthy persons live scandalously and miserably; riches do them no service in order to virtue and happiness; it is precept and principle, not an estate, that makes a man good for something.

Character | Good | Man | Nothing | Order | Precept | Riches | Service | Virtue | Virtue | Riches |

Léon Bloy

Man has places in his heart which do not yet exist, and into them enters suffering, in order that they may have existence.

Character | Existence | Heart | Man | Order | Suffering |

James Boswell

There is no passion so distressing as fear, which gives us great pain and makes us appear contemptible in our own eyes to the last degree. Fear is in almost all cases a wretched instrument of government, and ought in particular never to be employed against any order of men who have the smallest pretensions to independency.

Character | Fear | Government | Men | Order | Pain | Passion |

Ludwig Börne, fully Karl Ludwig Börne

You must learn to know others in order to know yourself.

Character | Order | Learn |

Barry Cornwall, pseudonymn for Bryan Waller Procter

Death is the tyrant of the imagination. His reign is in solitude and darkness, in tombs and prisons, over weak hearts and seething brains. He lives, without shape or sound, a phantasm, inaccessible to sight or touch - a ghastly and terrible apprehension.

Character | Darkness | Death | Imagination | Solitude | Sound | Wisdom |

Jeremy Collier

How are such an infinite number of things placed with such order in the memory, notwithstanding the tumult, marches, and counter-marches of the animal spirits?

Character | Memory | Order |

G. K. Chesterton, fully Gilbert Keith Chesterton

We must be fond of the world, even in order to change it.

Change | Character | Order | World |

Albert Einstein

Strange is our situation here upon earth. Each of us comes for a short visit, not knowing why, yet sometimes seeming to divine a purpose. From the standpoint of daily life, however, there is one thing we do know: that man is here for the sake of other men - above all for those upon whose smile and well-being our own happiness depends, and also for the countless unknown souls with whose fate we are connected by a bond of sympathy. Many times a day I realize how much my own outer and inner life is built upon the labors of my fellow men, both living and dead, and how earnestly I must exert myself in order to give in return as much as I have received. My peace of mind is often troubled by the depressing sense that I have borrowed too heavily from the work of other men.

Character | Day | Earth | Fate | Knowing | Life | Life | Man | Men | Mind | Order | Peace | Purpose | Purpose | Sense | Smile | Sympathy | Work | Fate | Happiness |

Diogenes Laërtius, aka "Diogenes the Cynic"

We have two ears and only one tongue in order that we may hear more and speak less.

Character | Order |

Fyodor Dostoevsky, fully Fyodor Mikhaylovich Dostoevsky or Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski

The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to such a pass that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others. And having no respect he ceases to love, and in order to occupy and distract himsefl without love he gives away his passions and coarse pleasuures, and sinks to bestiality in his vices, all from continual lying to other men and to himsefl. The man wholies to himself can be more easily offended than anyone.

Character | Distinguish | Love | Lying | Man | Men | Order | Respect | Truth | Respect |

François Fénelon, fully Francois de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon

The passion of acquiring riches in order to support a vain expense corrupts the purest souls.

Character | Order | Passion | Riches | Riches |

Henry Fielding

Affectation proceeds from one of these two causes - vanity or hypocrisy; for as vanity puts us on affecting false characters, in order to purchase applause; so hypocrisy sets us on an endeavor to avoid censure, by concealing our vices under an appearance of their opposite virtues.

Affectation | Appearance | Applause | Censure | Character | Hypocrisy | Order |